ImmigrantRights

Archive for February, 2009|Monthly archive page

South Florida Demands: “Stop Deportations of Haitians Now!”

In Haiti TPS on February 28, 2009 at 1:33 am

Haitian Women of Miami (FAMN),to rally to stop inhumane detentions and deportations

POMPANO BEACH – On Saturday, February 28th at 3:00 p.m. hundreds of Florida residents, including members of Haitian Women of Miami (FAMN), Haitian Citizen United Taskforce (HCUT), the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC), Unite for Dignity and the Florida Immigrant Coalition (FLIC), among many other concerned community members, will gather at the Broward Transitional Center (3900 N. Powerline Rd., Pompano Beach) to acknowledge the contribution the Haitian community continues to make to our state and demand an end to the deportation of our Haitian sisters and brothers.

Haitian deportees face hunger, homelessness and unemployment, if not worse, in the wake of four killer storms that further devastated our hemisphere’s poorest nation. Conditions in Haiti remain abysmal. The storms destroyed 15 percent of its GDP–the equivalent of 8 to 10 Hurricane Katrinas hitting the U.S. in one month. Further, the State Department renewed warnings not to travel to Haiti due to the “destructive impact” of the storms.

The former administration stayed deportations to Haiti in September only to resume them abruptly in December after temporary protected status was denied. This was a last-minute Department of Homeland Security policy reversal. Haitian nationals in Florida live under the constant fear of deportation. Stopping deportations and releasing detainees would restore America’s commitment to the rule of law and the principle of equal protection by granting Haitians the same deserved protection granted other similarly-situated nationals.

“People in the Haitian community could be deported at any time and are even afraid to go to their churches. We should not live in fear, but need to speak out for justice. Stopping the deportations is the first step,” said Bob Louis-Jeune of the Haitian Citizen United Taskforce (HCUT) and Palm Beach Immigrant Rights Coalition (PBIRC).

“We understand that President Obama’s focus is on the economy, but Haitians have been suffering for so long. At a strike of a pen, he can end their misery! It makes strong economic and humanitarian sense for him to do so. It is time to right this wrong” said Marleine Bastien, Founder and Executive Director of FANM/Haitian Women of Miami.

Advertisements

-NOT IN MY NAME-

In Haiti TPS on February 24, 2009 at 7:52 pm


30.000 HAITIANS HAVE BEEN ORDERED DEPORTATION

600 ARE UNDER ICE CUSTODY

AND 200 ARE UNDER HOUSE ARREST

STAND UP FOR HUMAN RIGHTS!!

Fight back the terrorism of immigrant communities!

Fight back the institutional racism!

FLYER
Photobucket

Saturday, February 28, 2009

3:00pm – 6:00pm

Broward Transitional Center

3900 N. Powerline Road

Pompano Beach, FL

ICE HALTS DEPORTATION OF SICK CHILD’S MOTHER

In Haiti TPS on February 23, 2009 at 4:55 am

This Week in Haiti” is the English section of HAITI LIBERTE newsweekly. For
the complete edition with other news in French and Creole, please contact
the paper at (tel) 718-421-0162, (fax) 718-421-3471 or e-mail at
editor@haitiliberte.com. Also visit our website at
http://www.haitiliberte.com

HAITI LIBERTE
“Justice. Verite. Independance.”

* THIS WEEK IN HAITI *

February 11 – 17, 2009
Vol. 2, No. 30

deportation-036
By Francesca Guerrier

“Thank God we are still together!” exclaimed Vialine Jean-Paul after her fortunes took a turn for the better this week.

After living in the U.S. for the past 17 years, the 34-year-old Haitian woman, whose husband and daughter are both U.S. citizens, had been ordered to buy her own plane ticket back to Haiti.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) deportation order – with an enforceable date of Monday, February 9 – was handed down despite the grave health problems of Ms. Jean-Paul’s 7-year-old daughter, Angela Julie Timot. The child suffers from several serious medical conditions which require constant care. (The family asked that the illnesses not be specified.) The stress of a prolonged mother-child separation could also hurt the child’s health, doctors said, just as it affected her mother.

“When I was told I was being deported back to Haiti, my blood sugar surged to 500, and I had to be taken to Jackson’s Memorial Hospital,” Ms. Jean-Paul told Haiti Liberté.

On the morning that she was going to turn herself into immigration authorities, Ms. Jean-Paul and her family were en route to the Catholic Service Legal Office in downtown Miami to hold a press conference. But at 8 .15 a.m., an ICE official called her to say that the agency was temporarily staying the deportation order against her.

The press conference ended up being celebratory rather than tragic. Beleaguered ICE officials may well have been seeking a much-needed public relations boost by granting the stay.

The family’s attorneys say that ICE officials gave no explanation for the stay. Ms. Jean-Paul has a pending request for citizenship.

At the press conference, the family rejoiced. Asked for her reaction to the stay of deportation, young Angela said she was “very happy” that her mother was staying so she could study to become a school-teacher when she grows up.

The story of Ms. Jean-Paul, her daughter, and her husband of 11 years, naturalized U.S. citizen Journel Timot, touched many.

Haitian refugee advocates have questioned how the U.S. government can continue deporting undocumented Haitians when as recently as Feb. 2 the State Department warned U.S. citizens to defer all non-essential travel to Haiti due to the nation’s devastation and lawlessness caused by storms last fall that left close to 1000 dead and one million homeless.

On Feb. 5, Haitian President René Préval met with U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in Washington, DC. He requested $100 million to fill a budget gap which might send desperate Haiti into what he called “anarchy.”

It is unknown whether he again requested Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haitians as he did, unsuccessfully, from the Bush administration last fall.

Hoping for a different response from the Obama administration, refugee advocates have renewed their campaign for TPS for Haitians, which would cover long-time residents and citizenship candidates like Ms. Jean-Paul.

All articles copyrighted Haiti Liberte. REPRINTS ENCOURAGED.
Please credit Haiti Liberte.

SIGN THE PETITION

In Haiti TPS on February 1, 2009 at 8:03 am

HAITI FACT SHEET: STOP DEPORTATIONS NOW

Why the U.S. Government should IMMEDIATELY halt deportations to Haiti:

• During a one-month period, and in rapid succession, FOUR DEVASTATING STORMS ravaged Haiti
• The World Bank assessed the storm damage at nearly ONE BILLION DOLLARS, or about 15 percent of Haiti’s GDP.
THIS EQUALS EIGHT TO TEN HURRICANE KATRINAS HITTING THE UNITED STATES IN A MONTH
• The United Nations has called this “the worst disaster to hit Haiti in 100 years”
• Over 800 people were killed, with thousand missing or injured
• Haiti’s third largest city, Gonaives, has been rendered uninhabitable
• Massive flooding caused nationwide damage to agriculture and infrastructure including roads, bridges, water and sanitation systems, schools, hospitals and housing.
• Inadequate sanitation and potable water and standing pools of polluted flood water have left hundreds of thousands at risk of malaria, hepatitis, and cholera
• The nation’s food crop has been largely destroyed, as have farm tools, seeds for next year’s crop, and livestock and irrigation systems vital to farmers and rice production
• Dozens of children have starved to death, and UNICEF has said that 300,000 children are at risk of severe malnutrition

What the US Government should do in response to this humanitarian Crisis:

• Immediately halt all deportations to Haiti
• Grant Deferred Enforced Departure and/or Temporary Protected Status to Haitians in the United States for 18 months; and for those so protected:
• Authorize them to work;
• Release them from detention; and
• Suspend all legal and administrative proceedings against them.

How halting deportations helps Haiti and protects U. S. interests:

• Allows Haiti to prepare and safely receive returnees in the future, reducing the stress on a fragile economy unable to assimilate additional homeless, jobless migrants
• Enables Haitians in the United States to work, pay taxes, and send remittances to relatives in Haiti crucial to their survival
• Protects U.S. borders and resources by sustaining life-sustaining remittances and reducing socio-economic burdens which lead to desperate emigration attempts; reduced outflow preserves U.S. Coast Guard, Border Patrol, detention, and administrative resources.
• Safeguards U.S.-born American children from having their parents ripped away from them; the destruction of these families is fundamentally un-American.
• Restores U.S. commitment to the rule of law and the principle of equal protection by granting Haitians the same deserved protection granted other similarly-situated nationals
IT IS THE HUMANE THING TO DO

PLEASE SUPPORT HUMAN RIGHTS FOR HAITIANS, CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO SIGN THIS PETITION, AND SPREAD THE WORD
THANK-YOU!

http://www.PetitionOnline.com/TPS2009/petition.html